Green Hope High School Athletics

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What is a Concussion?

A concussion is a brain injury caused by a trauma. Examples include but are not limited to: hit or fall to the head or whiplash. This trauma can cause impairment.
The impairment can be temporary or permanent.
A concussion can result in four kinds of symptoms: physical, cognitive, emotional, and sleep-related. 

Physical symptoms:
Headache, dizziness, balance problems, nausea, vomiting, sensitivity to light or noise, numbness & tingling, and fatigue.
Cognitive symptoms:
Feeling mentally foggy, feeling slowed down, confusion, difficulty concentrating, and difficulty remembering events before or after the injury.
Emotional symptoms:
Feeling irritable, sadness, feeling more emotional than usual, and nervousness.
Sleep-related symptoms:
Drowsiness, sleeping more or less than usual, and trouble falling asleep

 
Post-Concussion Protocol

1. If a student-athlete exhibits signs and symptoms consistent with a concussion (even if not formally diagnosed), the student-athlete is to be removed from play and is not allowed to return to play (game, practice, or conditioning) on that day.

2. Student-athletes are encouraged to report their own symptoms, or to report if peers may have concussion symptoms.

3. Coaches, parents, volunteers, first responders, school nurse, licensed athletic trainers (if available), are responsible for removing a student-athlete from play if they suspect a concussion.

4. Following the injury, a qualified medical professional (with training in concussion management) should evaluate the student-athlete. Medical professionals that are acceptable in the area are OSNC Urgent Care-REX Healthcare, Neurologists, and Carolina Family Practice and Sports Medicine Concussion Hotline. 

5. In order for the student-athlete to return to play without restriction, he/she must have written clearance (Gfellar Waller Forms) from an appropriate medical professional.  The form that should be used for this written clearance is posted below.


Gefeller-Waller Concussion Act